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Line Pairs, Angles, and Quadrilaterals

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We’ve been focused on all things geometry in the Applicious Classroom these past few weeks! After weeks of test prep and then actual testing, it’s nice to have finally returned to “normal” curriculum and infuse fun back into our block! 
Our curriculum outlines that students should be able to distinguish between different quadrilaterals based on their attributes of lines and angles. The problem? As a former second grade teacher, I know these kiddos had no clue about angles or line pairs. 
What to do? 
Well…First, we set to work on laying the foundation with content specific vocabulary for line pairs. It’s hard to understand that a parallelogram has 2 sets of parallel lines if you don’t know what those are! 
We worked to come up with hand motions to solidify the three basic types of line pairs. 
line pairs hand motions
Once we understood each type of line, the students came up with hand motions to match thme. 
Here’s the 3 we came up with..
Two lines that will never meet..
parallel lines
 Lines that meet at a 90 degree angle…
perpendicular lines
Two lines that cross..
intersecting lines activity
Once we had a handle on those… we moved onto angles. 
The kiddos came up with these two gestures…
Awh! They’re just so a-CUTE!
hand gesture for acute angles
 OBTUSE! 
teaching obtuse angles
We used the same gesture of perpendicular to illustrate a right angle. 
Then, it was time to apply this learning to understanding 4 sided polygons. 
In second grade, we worked on all different types of polygons, so it was exciting to focus only on Quadrilaterals and the different specific types in this unique group.
We used food to help explore the attributes of  trapezoids, squares, parallelograms, rhombus, and rectangles.
build a quadrilateral hands on activity
To complete this activity, I called out attributes of the quadrilateral and students used the marshmallows and pretzels to build their shape. 
quadrilateral hands on activity
Talk about a perfect formative assessment opportunity! As students built their shapes, I circled around and made notes of the kiddos who struggle to create the correct quadrilateral. 

editable quadrilateralsquadrilateral activities

During our math center time, I pulled those kiddos to my small group to work on understanding of our key terms and the attributes of each shape.
Now bring on that Friday! 
Be sure to check back here on Sunday! I’ve teamed up with SOME AMAZING teacher bloggers and companies to bring you some drool worthy prize packs for Teacher Appreciation week!  
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3 Responses

  1. I did a simpler version with my IO class last year. We did horizontal, vertical and parallel lines using our arms to demonstrate.

  2. I did a simpler version with my IO class last year. We did horizontal, vertical and parallel lines using our arms to demonstrate.

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Hi, I'm Leigh.

The Applicious Teacher is all about creating hands-on and engaging lessons that align with the standards while still having time for your life. This is your place for ideas, tips, and resources for the REAL teacher!

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