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How is it already the middle of October????!!!  Where has the time gone? 
Sorry I’ve been a *bit* MIA last week. 
It was the end of the quarter for us here, which means grades were due and well… I think that’s ‘nough said! LOL! 
 As the month of October flies by, we’ve been delving into all things creepy, spooky, and Halloween related (in a totally educational way, of course!) 
We started the month off learning about bats…
 (and turned our classroom into a bat cave while we were at it… You can read more about that here! )
The moved onto spiders…
(LOVE this FREEBIE from Amy Lemons! Click here to read more!) 
Now we’re moving onto skeletons, pumpkins, and Halloween! 
(Don’t you just HEART October? It is seriously one of my favorite times of year to teach!)
So this week, we are focusing in on what happens when you break a bone with a *little* bit of Halloween sprinkled in!
With bones on the brain, I thought it would be a perfect time to pull in Skeletons. We learned more about our skeletal system using this site:
Click here (or the picture) to check it out! There’s a lot of interesting facts and videos on bones and the skeletal system.
We even created our own model of the skeletal system using Q-Tips!

(You can grab this activity here for FREE!)

Even my little turkey is getting in on the skeleton fun! 
Cutest bag of bones I’ve ever seen! 😉 
In writing, we’ve just started learning about expository writing.  Since this week we are already discussing what to do when you get hurt, we are working on explaining what steps you would take to “Heal a Wound”. 

We are using my “How to Heal a Wound” Craftivity Pack to walk us through the writing process!
(With hopes that by Friday, we will be making these cuties! Fingers crossed!)
Today, we brainstormed as a class all the things needed to heal a wound, and the basic steps you would follow.
(My favorite suggestion: “Have mommy kiss it to make it feel better.” I melted!) 
As we brainstormed, we discussed how transition words like first, then, next, and last help guide the reader through the process we are describing.  Tomorrow, we are taking our brainstorms and turning them into paragraphs with the help of this scaffold style writing sheet. 
It’s designed to guide little writers to include specific parts and sentences in their expository piece. 
You can grab these pages and the rest of this expository pack here at my TpT store
To help bring in a *bit* of {educational} Halloween, I can’t wait for my kiddos to do this inferencing  activity from Halle over at, Across the Hall in Second Grade.  
Slide1
I’ll be back later this week to share more about our skeleton and Halloween fun! Next week we start pumpkins with a “Pumpkin Day” to boot! 🙂  

 

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Hi, I'm Leigh.

The Applicious Teacher is all about creating hands-on and engaging lessons that align with the standards while still having time for your life. This is your place for ideas, tips, and resources for the REAL teacher!

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